New Delhi, Nov. 30 -- The stories in Aruni Kashyap's His Father's Disease move between faraway places. Between remote villages in Assam and cosmopolitan New Delhi, or even farther to New York and Minnesota. Wherever they are, Kashyap's characters are trying to make sense of transitions-of movements between divergent cultures, but also between different versions of themselves. The dust jacket of the book-Kashyap's second in English-describes it as bearing "the spirit of modern post colonial storytellers". That is also the collection's biggest obstacle. In doggedly trying to articulate the complications of geography and identity, it remains inconsistent in developing fleshed-out characters.

In The Umricans, Himjyoti goes to Minnesota to st...